How to Teach EPIK Textbooks

Hello everyone ~ 

In this post, I will tell you how to teach Epik textbooks. I made a post before about what typical EPIK and SMOE textbooks look like. Today, I want to go through the textbooks and let you know how I teach some sections. Each textbook comes with a teacher’s manual. These manuals tell you step by step how to teach the textbook. I’m not sure if anyone actually uses the teacher’s manual to teach their classes but I just use it as a reference.

How you teach the textbook depends on you co-teacher. Each co-teacher will be different. Some want to teach all of the textbook, others will only cover some parts, and some don’t want to teach the textbook at all. Honestly many parts of the textbooks are quite boring so I recommend to skip those parts and find better activities.

Before I go into details on how I teach the textbooks, I want to touch briefly on my co-teaching styles.

4th grade co-teacher: 50/50

With my 4th grade co-teacher we usually split the time we teach in half. She teaches 20 minutes of the textbook and afterwards I do a 20 minute game. Other times, she might do a 20 minute test then I do10 minutes of the textbook and a short 10 minute game.

5th grade co-teacher: 90/10

My 5th grade co-teacher likes me to teach 90 percent of the class but she always does chants and songs before the lesson. Even though I am mostly teaching, she does a great job supporting me and explaining things to the kids. I usually teach 2 pages of the textbook then do a 15 or 20 minute game.

6th grade co-teacher: 40/50

I would say I teach about 40 percent of the class time with 6th graders. I start class with a tongue twister but my co-teacher always helps me explain the meaning to the kids. After doing a tongue twister, my co-teacher will teach 1 or 2 sections of the textbook. Afterwards, we usually only have about 10 or 15 minutes left. If I can, I try to do a short game, if not then we just do some kind of worksheet.

Now, that you know a little bit about my teaching role, let’s take a look at how I teach certain sections of the textbook. Most sections of the textbook I teach using the CD-Rom. Listen to the clip and answer the question or read the sentences and answer the questions.
Other parts are a little more difficult so I will share some ways that I have learned to teach these particular sections.

 

4th

5th

6th

Period 1

  • Look and Listen
  • Chant
  • Listen and Do
Period 1

  • Look and Listen
  • Listen and Do
  • Chant
  • Listen and Play 
Period 1

  • Look and Listen
  • Listen and Do
  • Chant
  • Listen and Play
Period 2

  • Look and Say
  • Say More
  • Hello, World! (Skip)
  • Play Together 1 
Period 2

  • Look and Say
  • Listen and Repeat
  • Talk Together (Skip)
  • Speak and Play  
Period 2

  • Look and Say
  • Listen and Repeat
  • Talk Together (Skip)
  • Speak and Play
Period 3

  • Read and write
  • Play Together 2 
Period 3

  • Speak and read
  • Read and Do
  • Read and Play (Skip)
  • Fun with Words
Period 3

  • Speak and read
  • Read and Do
  • Read and Play (Skip)
  • Fun with Sentences
Period 4

  • Story Land
  • Check Up
Period 4

  • Let’s Read
    • Read and Check 
    • Read and Role Play (Skip)
  • Read and Connect
  • Write It
  • Write and Share
Period 4

  • Let’s Read
    • Quiz 
    • Read and Check 
  • Read and Connect
  • Write It
  • Write and Share
*After every 2 chapters

1 phonics lesson and 1 project

Period 5

  • Fun Time
  • Act and Play & Project (Skip)
Period 5

  • Fun Time
  • Act and Play & Project (Skip)
Period 6

  • Check up
  • I Can Do It 
  • Yes, I Can
  • We Are the World
  • Mission!
Period 6

  • Check up
  • I Can Do It 
  • Yes, I Can (Skip)
  • We Are the World (Skip)
  • Mission (Skip)
*After every 3-4 chapters

1 review section (4 total)

*After every 3-4 chapters

1 review section (4 total)

4th

5th

6th

How to Teach the Textbook

Look and Listen/Look and Say

First option

Students look at the pictures and check (Who are they? Where are they? What are they doing?) Next, make teams. Write on the board A, B, C, D, E, and F. There are about 24 students in my classes so I make 6 teams of 4 students. If there are less students then I only make 5 teams. Play the video clip and after I ask them, “What did you hear?”

The textbooks break down these clips into 2-4 scenes. I play the first scene and then ask them: “What did you hear?” Each scene in the YBM textbook usually has 3 to 5 sentences. The Cheonjae textbooks have longer texts. Students raise their hands and say one sentence that they heard from the video. If they say a correct sentence, I give their team one point. If nobody remembers any sentences, I play the clip one more time.

If the same students keep raising their hands to answer, say “new face/new student.” Have higher level students tell their team the sentence so that those students have a chance to speak.

*Rewards*

After all the scenes, my co-teacher will give each team stamp points for their reward chart. Teams with the most points on the board get 2 stamps and other teams get 1 stamp. Honestly, points or rewards aren’t necessary but if you have classes where students don’t participate then having a reward or point system is a good idea.

Finally, we listen to the CD-Rom again, repeat the sentences, and answer the questions. Most of these sections will include 1 or 2 comprehension questions.

Second option

Another way to teach these sections is by not showing the video clips and only listening to them. This method is better suited to higher level classes. Write (who, what ,where) on the board. Listen to the video clip and students try to figure out who is talking, what they talking about, and where they are. Write their answers on the board then we watch the video clip and check to see if their answers match. This method doesn’t always work because it’s hard to tell what character is talking or where they may be.

Let’s Read

These sections contain 2 paragraphs. You can either teach this section by listening to the story and then repeating line by line. Another way to teach this section is by making a PPT.

Read one sentence and have the students repeat after them. Then we read all the sentences together. I show the first paragraph on the PPT and tell them ROUND 1 – EASY. We start reading the paragraph together. Some words in the paragraph are covered and students have to remember what those words are.

For the second round, more words are covered and so on. During the last round, most of the words are covered. This is kind of a memorization game so as you reach the final round, students should be able to recite the paragraphs by memory.

Chant/Sing/Song/Fun Time

Chants are really boring and sound weird most of the time but they do help student’s remember the key expressions. Find other fun esl songs on YouTube that match the key expressions. Sometimes you can find good songs on Youtube, Waygook, or Korshare. If you can’t find a good song then just use the textbooks or skip them completely.

How to learn chants

Listen to the chant one time, repeat it line by line, and then chant it all together. Chants/song are separated into parts so make teams and assign them a part of the chant. When their part comes on then those students stand up and sing their lines. You can switch the parts and have them continue until each team has sung those parts.

Each time you meet the students, try to start the classes by singing the chants and song. This is a good review for them to remember the key expressions.

For Fun Time sections, just teach it as a role play. Watch the video, check the expressions, and practice and repeat with your partner.

Play together/Listen and Play/Speak and Play

Try to prepare your own games or find some on Waygook & korshare. The textbook games are really boring most of the time. I try to adapt these games and make them into something more interesting.

Make active games that get the kids up and moving. This is more enjoyable then just having kids sit at their desk. Please be warned that active games do make classes a little bit crazy!

Speak and Read 

Speak and Read is always boring because you have to drill the key expressions over and over. There are two ways that I teach this section. The first way is just teaching it from the CD-Rom. Listen to the dialogue and repeat it.

The second way I teach this section is by making a PPT. I put the key expressions on a slide and add funny gifs or picture of K-pop idols. This helps students to stay engaged but sometimes they do start laughing and straying off topic because of the gifs. Funny gifs and K-pop pictures make it more fun for students to practice the key expressions.

Storyland

Storyland or some story sections are included in 3rd and 4th grade textbooks. These are short stories with about 3 -4 characters. I start these sections by watching the video clips then practicing together line by line. Give each student a script and team. They do rock, scissors, papers to decide roles.

Put 7 minutes on the timer and tell them to practice and use big body actions. After the practice time, we watch and repeat the video clip one more time. The first team comes to the front of the class and does the role play. I try to find some props so that it makes their role-play funnier.

Storyland can get a bit boring if you do role play for each lesson so I recommend trying to find other ways to teach this section.

Reviews/Projects

I usually skip the textbook reviews and just make my own game or use a bomb game on Waygook. Relay games or minute to win it games are fun for reviews. Students always have fun when there’s competition involved.

Projects are unnecessary unless you want to use them. If my co-teacher wants to do them then I try to adapt them into something more interesting.

There’s so many different styles to teach but these are just some methods that have worked well in my classes. What sections you teach will always depend on what your co-teacher wants. If you really don’t like a section, try to talk to your co-teacher and ask if you can do something else.
A fun activity is always better then the textbook. Textbooks are just there as a guide. As long as you cover the key expressions and vocabulary then anything you choose to do is fine. I hope you found these helpful in some way. ~

2 thoughts on “How to Teach EPIK Textbooks

  1. Wonderfully detailed instructional. I’m so glad you did this. Wish this had been around when I first started …two years ago. I think you’ll help a lot of people with this!

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